Devery
Devery
Token: EVE


Product Verification Protocol

PreICO dates
Start date: 15th Dec 2017
End date: 23rd Dec 2017

ICO dates
Start date: 2018-01-18
End date: 2018-01-19

Registrated in: Undefined

Platform: Ethereum

PREMIUM ICO

https://devery.io/ Screenshot
Devery categories
Retail Platform Manufacturing Business services
Video
Devery token sale
KYC passing required No | Whitelist No | Restriction for countries No
Soft cap 200,000 USD
Hard cap 10,000,000 USD
Tokens for sale 60,000,000
Token distribution in ICO
60%
60%
Price 1 ETH = 5,865 EVE
Minimal investment 0.5 ETH
Acceppting ETH
Bonus in ICO
Pre-sale 5%
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Random whitepaper excerpts

Contents
1 Background
3
2 Market Players
4
2.1 The seller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
2.2 The purchaser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
2.3 The mediator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
3 Devery Protocol and Ecosystem
5
3.1 Decentralized protocol layer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
3.2 Devery Toolset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
3.3 Decentralized application layer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
3.4 Entry Verification Engine (EVE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
4 Use Cases
8
4.1 Online Product Verification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
4.2 Digital Signing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
4.3 Physical Signing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

1 Background
According to a 2016 joint report by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and
Development (OECD) and EU Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO), imports of
counterfeit and pirated goods amount to approximately half a trillion dollars a year or
around 2.5% of global imports[1].
xw
Figure 1- Data provided by the OECD.
These figures are steadily increasing each year, with the United States and Europe
affected the most by its impacts. The OECD Deputy Secretary-General, Doug Frantz,
states:

The findings of this new report contradict the image that counterfeiters only
hurt big companies and luxury goods manufacturers. They take advantage of
our trust in trademarks and brand names to undermine economies and
endanger lives
”[2]
Counterfeit products that have been seized range from luxury goods (such as handbags,
perfumes and watches) to fake products that have the capacity to endanger lives ? toys
that harm children, pharmaceuticals that do ...

2 Market Players
There are three key players that are affected by counterfeit goods and this paper will
explore the impacts to each.
2.1 The seller
The seller (which may be the supplier, retailer or otherwise) is a profit-making entity
and relies upon the quality of the produce sold and the reliability of the brand name
developed. As the OECD states:

The essential component that the commercial supply of counterfeit products
relies on is ’free riding’ on the economic value associated with a given
intellectual property right
”[1]
Counterfeits abuse the brand name and intellectual property of other sellers, which hurts
the overall reputation and profitability of a business. Further, the damage to consumer
confidence affects the potential customer base of any business affected by the counterfeit
products.
2.2 The purchaser
The purchaser is deceived into purchasing fake products that do not serve the expected
purpose and/or may contain harmful si...

3 Devery Protocol and Ecosystem
The underlying Devery Protocol will enable developers to easily create verification
applications without a thorough understanding of the blockchain. The Devery Protocol
will abstract the complexities of interacting with smart contracts by deploying
pre-developed smart contracts for an improved developer experience. The end result is
an ecosystem of verification applications that communicate and interact with each other
through the Devery Protocol.
3.1 Decentralized protocol layer
The protocol layer consists of 3 main data structures that interact via the Ethereum
mapping method within the DeveryRegistry.sol and the DeveryTrust.sol contracts.
DeveryRegistry.sol
The application layer specifies an address to register the application’s unique
identifier on the protocol alongside the application’s name and fee account.
This allows the application to collect fees from users of third party
verification applications built on the protocol.
struct...

This information is then hashed via the
addressHash(address item)
function and marked with the corresponding product public address, which
uses the hashed address as a reference for lookup. This is the individual
identifier for each product stored on the blockchain, and allows lookup via
the
check(address item)
method.
DeveryTrust.sol
The Devery trust contract allows ethereum addresses to ’vouch’ for other
addresses. This allows third parties to become trusted intermediaries.
Ethereum addresses can revoke and apply vouches for brand and application
keys via the
approve(address brandKey)
and
revoke(address brandKey)
public methods.
Figure 2 - Visual representation of data structures.
The protocol smart contracts can be found at:
https://github.com/devery/devery_contracts
3.2 Devery Toolset
Open source frameworks will be provided to developers to ensure the developer
experience is user friendly. Developers can opt to use...

Devery.js
Devery.js provides a npm packaged Javascript framework that is built on top
of Web3.js and the protocol layer to create an abstracted, developer-friendly
tool to build on the Devery protocol. Using this layer, developers can opt to
interact with the blockchain through Javascript and build commercial
verification applications without the need to interact directly with the
protocol’s smart contracts.
devery keygenerator
We have also provided a simple key generation tool to allow developers to
generate public key addresses and associated QR codes for input into their
applications.
The repository can be found at:
https://github.com/devery/devery_keygenerator
3.3 Decentralized application layer
Applications will build on top of the protocol to form the decentralized application layer.
This will enable commercial applications to build and charge for services whilst using the
Devery protocol.
For Example, Bevery may choose to use the Devery protocol to verif...

4 Use Cases
This paper will describe a few example use cases of the Devery Protocol. This is not an
exhaustive list.
4.1 Online Product Verification
The Devery Protocol enables e-commerce retailers to verify the authenticity of any
products or services they sell online. Retailers can assign unique ID signatures to each
product sold online with a third-party verification application built on top of the
Protocol. The retailer can then display unique one-time-use hashes generated from this
ID to any potential customers that wish to verify the authenticity of a product.
Consumers then log onto the application and input the code marked on the product in
order to identify its authenticity. As well as this, origins and manufacturing can be
disclosed dependent on the brand’s preference.
An example of what this may look like is illustrated in the diagram below:
8
...

4.2 Digital Signing
The Devery Protocol can be used to verify that digital goods and services are issued
from a legitimate source. An example would be digital certificates from online courses,
colleges or universities. A certificate can be assigned a unique ID signature that can be
verified via an application built on top of the Devery Protocol. The recipient of the
certificate and any potential employer that wants to check its legitimacy can verify the
certificate through this application. Further, details regarding the recipient?s results,
behavior or other academic details can be stored on the chain.
4.3 Physical Signing
NFC and RFID chips, as well as barcodes and QR codes are compatible with the Devery
Protocol. Unique ID signatures generated from the protocol can be stored into a physical
marker and attached to a product. As the product moves across the supply chain, each
party that handles the product can verify its source via an application on the Devery
Protocol and update detai...

Devery Roadmap

1
Q4 2017
Release alpha of Devery protocol, consumer verification & brand marking application
2
Q1 2018
Trial implementation with our e-commerce partners
3
Q2 2018
Launch the beta of the protocol and brand marking application
4
Q3 2018
Release the full version of the protocol and brand marking application
5
Q4 2018
Release the Consumer iOS and Android applications
Andrew Rasheed
Andrew Rasheed Founder & Product Lead

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Dorjee Sun
Advisor
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