Laser
Laser
Token: Photon


Blockchain Without Borders

ICO dates
Start date: 2018-07-30
End date: 2018-11-15

Registrated in: Cayman Islands

Platform: Separate blockchain
Type: ERC20

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Laser categories
Platform
Laser whitepaper
Video
Laser token sale
KYC passing required No | Whitelist No | Restriction for countries USA
Acceppting ETC,ETH
Laser operates on top of any existing blockchain network and optimizes their functions It increases transaction speeds and allows seamless interaction between existing blockchains.It removes the technical barriers which separate blockchains.
Laser news, social
Laser search trends in Google
Random whitepaper excerpts

Abstract
Since the inception of Bitcoin (and its underlying blockchain concept) in 2009, several
other cryptocurrencies both similar and dissimilar have emerged. Although
technologically and socioeconomically disruptive, most of these peer-to-peer
transaction mechanisms have their own limitations. Issues such as slow transaction
speeds and transaction confirmations, an inability to interoperate blockchains with one
another (e.g. cannot easily transact Bitcoin for Ethereum), and incomplete anonymity of
users have hindered wide-scale deployment. These topics have been widely researched,
in pursuit of a solution for each of these shortcomings.
In this paper, we propose a mechanism called the Laser Network to address these
issues with a blockchain-agnostic design that we call a
service layer
. This service layer
will enable secure transfers across different blockchains while also providing
mechanisms to achieve near-instant transactions, and improved anonymity of users.
Laser will...

Table of Contents
Abstract .................................................................................................................................... 1
1. Executive Summary............................................................................................................. 5
2. Cryptocurrencies and Blockchains .................................................................................... 8
3. Limitations of Current Blockchain Solutions .................................................................... 9
3.1 Lack of Scalability ......................................................................................................... 9
3.2 Incomplete Privacy........................................................................................................ 9
3.3 Incomplete Fungibility................................................................................................. 10
3.4 Lack of Interoperability ............................................................................................

1. Executive Summary
Cryptocurrencies in their current state are not able to reach their fullest potential, for
reasons to do with limitations that are inherent to currencies in general, as well as of the
underlying blockchain t
echnology that supports each cryptocurrency. A “service layer”
solution is proposed that will unify these blockchains and ultimately enable them to
operate more efficiently both in and of themselves, and between one another.
Cryptocurrencies have attracted tremendous amounts of investment and interest from
the public, as well as the finance world. In spite of the fact that they (and their
underlying blockchain technologies) are in many ways superior to fiat currencies and
their banking systems, they are restrained from realizing large-scale success. Three key
reasons for this are as follows;

Blockchains are not easily interoperable (e.g. Bitcoin cannot easily be traded with
Ethereum, except through a third-party exchange)

Transactio...

Laser’s value proposition can be succinctly defined as “connecting and improving
blockchains”. It is a solution that operates as a layer of functionality on top of an
existing blockchain, in such a way that it can communicate with other blockchains
seamlessly. It will operate as a hard fork of Ethereum, and it will include a major airdrop
to current holders of Ethereum. This solution will also incentivize full nodes, something
that is not currently done on blockchains

which is important because a drop in full
nodes represents a functional liability in the event that people stop operating such
nodes, which are integral to the blockchain’s secure, reliable function.
Laser will address each of the three key factors that restrict blockchains from scaling;
Interoperability:
Laser will introduce a protocol where common elements of each blockchain are
standardized as such so that they can effectively “speak the same language” to each
other. For example, since Bitcoin and Et...

most transactions to happen in. Laser introduces an overlay protocol that provides
“pseudo
-
confirmation” for transactions, enabling confirmation in a matter
of seconds.
Anonymity:
Through a “joining” service, multiple transactions can be bundled and disbursed to
specified recipients, in order to obfuscate the movements of currency (preventing
traceability through the blockchain). An example might have two transactions for $8
and $15 being sent anonymously. They will be combined into a single $23 payment,
payable to a “ghost” recipient that is pre
-programmed to take $8 and send it to one
recipient, then take $15 and send it to the other.
As full nodes will be incentivized through the ability to earn transaction fees, running a
full node will now be a lucrative proposition. This will attract additional computing
resources for blockchains, improving the overall health of the ecosystem.
Finally, Laser’s blockchai
n will add a more efficient derivativ...

2. Cryptocurrencies and Blockchains
The year 2008 will remain an important year in the history of cryptocurrencies. This was
the year when the domain name Bitcoin.org was registered. Later in the same year, a
paper titled “
Bitcoin: A Peer-to-
Peer Electronic Cash System” [
1],
authored by a
pseudonym “Satoshi Nakamoto” was posted.
In 2009, Bitcoin came into existence, with the release of the first Bitcoin client, and the
issuance of the first block (the
genesis
block) on the Bitcoin network.
Since then, we have seen a proliferation of cryptocurrencies and a multitude of
blockchains. One very interesting after-
effect of cryptocurrencies’ initial surge of
popularity was the application of
blockchain
technology in areas other than
cryptocurrencies, with the main idea of harnessing it as a platform for enabling
decentralization while retaining trust.
Blockchain has expanded the areas of distributed ledger technology (DLT) a...

3. Limitations of Current Blockchain Solutions
Traditional blockchain technologies face several practical issues, which are hindering
the adaptation of these technologies into mainstream use. We will be focusing on the
blockchain technology implemented in Bitcoin as the central case study to demonstrate
its limitations. We believe that the blockchain mechanisms used in Bitcoin are well-
established, and have the largest base of installations as of this writing. Further, most
other cryptocurrencies use similar concepts in their blockchains. Hence, we believe the
limitations that Bitcoin faces are representative of those that are faced by other
cryptocurrencies as well.
The Bitcoin network faces the following challenges as of today;
3.1 Lack of Scalability
As per the Bitcoin Wiki, the
maximum transaction rate
of the current Bitcoin blockchain
implementation is limited to a maximum of ten transactions per second.
This is far behind the current capacity of payment networks such a...

3.3 Incomplete Fungibility
Fungibility is the property that detaches individual units of a currency from its past
owners. Hence, a US dollar coming from any source has an equivalent value to any
other US dollar. For instance, dollars sent by Alice will have the same market value as
those coming from Bob, even if Alice may have a bad market reputation. This
characteristic makes US dollars fungible. However, since Bitcoin transactions are
traceable in the current blockchain implementation, individual coins can have their value
tainted if it is known that they once belonged to an undesirable party. As such, the
fungibility of Bitcoin units cannot be guaranteed.
3.4 Lack of Interoperability
When it comes to making transactions with other blockchains, the Bitcoin network does
not support such transactions. In the fast-growing virtual economy, a lack of
interoperability between different cryptocurrencies will become a major problem. The
need of the hour is to have a network on which different curr...
Kyle Kemper
Kyle Kemper Executive Director of the nonprofit Blockchain Association of Canada

Mike Khoroshun
Mike Khoroshun Developer at Global Blockchain

Elizabeth Mccauley
Elizabeth Mccauley Business Development and Marketing Consultant

Jordan Nanos
Jordan Nanos Solution Architect at Hewlett Packard Enterprise

Katie Olver
Katie Olver Founder and CEO of Cryptoland PR

Kevin Barnes
Kevin Barnes Advisor

Emma Irwin
Emma Irwin Solutions Architect at Hewlett Packard Enterprise

Marc Seeman
Marc Seeman Director, Solution Architecture, Hewlett Packard Enterprise

Katie Olver
Katie Olver
Founder and CEO of Cryptoland PR
Press & Communications
Kyle Kemper
Kyle Kemper
Executive Director of the nonprofit Blockchain Association of Canada
Managing Director, Bitcoin Association of Canada
Blockchain Evangelist
Mike Khoroshun
Mike Khoroshun
Developer at Global Blockchain
Shidan Gouran
Shidan Gouran
CEO
Trevor Koverko
Trevor Koverko
Advisor
Polymath Founder
CEO OF POLYMATH SECURITIES TOKEN
CEO of Polymath
Founder of Polymath